Matthew ALLYN

Matthew ALLYN

Male 1605 - 1671  (~ 65 years)

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  • Name Matthew ALLYN 
    Christened 17 Apr 1605  Braunton, Devonshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Gender Male 
    Emigration 1633  Braunton, Devonshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Immigration 1633  Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Living 1636  Hartford, Hartford County, Connecticut Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Living 1648  Windsor, Hartford County, Connecticut Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Died 1 Feb 1670/1  Windsor, Hartford County, Connecticut Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    • The date is cited as 7 February in some sources.
    Person ID I32419  FamilyWorld
    Last Modified 24 Sep 2011 

    Father ALLYN OR ALLEN 
    Family ID F10789  Group Sheet

    Family Margret WYOT,   d. 12 Sep 1675, Windsor, Hartford County, Connecticut Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married 2 Feb 1626/7  Braunton, Devonshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Children 
     1. Mary ALLYN,   c. 20 Jan 1627/8, Braunton, Devonshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location
     2. John ALLYN,   c. 24 Feb 1630/1, Braunton, Devonshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location
     3. Thomas ALLYN,   b. Abt 1633
    Last Modified 24 Sep 2011 
    Family ID F10737  Group Sheet

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsChristened - 17 Apr 1605 - Braunton, Devonshire, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 2 Feb 1626/7 - Braunton, Devonshire, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsEmigration - 1633 - Braunton, Devonshire, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsImmigration - 1633 - Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsLiving - 1636 - Hartford, Hartford County, Connecticut Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsLiving - 1648 - Windsor, Hartford County, Connecticut Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 1 Feb 1670/1 - Windsor, Hartford County, Connecticut Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Maps 
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Photos
    'The Puritan' 1899 Augustus Saint-Gaudens
    "The Puritan" 1899 Augustus Saint-Gaudens

  • Notes 
    • Matthew Allyn left Braunton, Devonshire, England in 1633, arriving in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and later removed to Hartford in 1636 and Windsor, Connecticut in 1648. He had "'conference in England this last summer with certain merchants' (1640) [Lechford 416]. Given the extent of Matthew Allyn's business dealings it would not be surprising if he made other trips to England."

      His occupation was Merchant, and he was admitted to the Cambridge church prior to 1634/5 (implied by freemanship). "Since the Cambridge church as a whole moved to Hartford in 1636, Allyn remained a member of that church, but by 1644 he had been excommunicated, and his attempts to be reinstated by the Connecticut General Court were unsuccessful [CCCR 1:106, 111]. Matthew Allyn probably was admitted to the Windsor church upon his move there, along with his wife, but since he died prior to Matthew Grant's restrospective compilation of Windsor church records, he does not appear in the list of those admitted after the removal of the church from Dorchester to Windsor."

      "Although there is no direct evidence, the nature of his business and civic activities argue in favor of his being well-educated."

      He held several offices: Deputy from Cambridge to Massachusetts Bay General Court; deputy from Windsor to Connecticut General Court; and many other important appointments for Connecticut, including Patentee for Royal Charter, 1662, and Commissioner for United Colonies, 1664.

      "Granted one acre for a cowyard at Cambridge, 4 November 1633 [CaTR 6]; granted two acres in the Neck of Land, 2 February 1633/4 [CaTR 7]; received a proportionate share of six in the undivided meadow, 20 August 1635 [CaTR 13]; granted five acres of land, 8 February 1635/6 [CaTR 16]; held five 'houses' in town, 8 February 1635/6 [CaTR 18].

      "In the Cambridge land inventory on 10 October 1635 'Mathew Allen' held twelve parcels of land: one house in town with backside, about half a rood; one house in town with garden and backside, about half a rood; one cowhouse with a yard in Ox Marsh, about half a rood; one acre and a rood in Old Field; two acres in Wigwam Neck; two acres and a half on Small Lot Hill; twenty-seven acres in the Neck of Land; fifteen acres in the Neck of Land; two acres in Ox Marsh; ten acres in Ship Marsh; twenty-four acres in the Great Marsh; and twelve acres in the Great Marsh [CaBOP 25-26].

      "By 7 December 1638 Matthew Allyn had purchased from Plymouth Colony their trading post at Windsor [CCCR 1:53-54], and as late as 20 March 1654 Allyn and the town of Windsor were still bargaining over this enclave within Windsor [WiLR 1:134, 1A:125; Windsor Hist 2:27-28].

      "On 17 December 1638 Matthew Allen and Margaret his wife of Hartford conveyed certain lands in Devonshire to Thomas Allen of Barstaple in Devonshire, with a condition attached [Lechford 86-87]. The grantee of this instrument was Matthew's brother, and the land may have been part of his inheritance in Devonshire.

      "In the Hartford land inventory in February 1639/40 'Mr. Mathew Allen' held twelve parcels of land (all of which appear to have been granted to him early): two acres with dwelling house, outhouses, yards and gardens; two acres one rood nineteen perches in the Little Meadow; two acres (together with an island) 'on which his mill now standeth'; ten acres by the West Field; eight acres nine perches of meadow and swamp in the North Meadow; thirty-two acres three roods of meadow and swamp in the North Meadow; twenty-four acres two roods of meadow and swamp in the North Meadow; eight acres one rood twenty-four perches on the east side of the Great River; sixty-four acres in the Old Ox Pasture; twenty-nine acres three roods in the Cow Pasture; twelve acres twenty-six perches in the Neck of Land; and seventeen acres three roods twenty-six perches in the Neck of Land [HaBOP 144-47].

      "On 28 August 1661 the Connecticut General Court 'granted unto Mr. Math: Allyn, 400 acres of upland and 100 acres of meadow, where he can find it within Conect: liberties..." [CCCR 1:372].

      "In his will, dated 30 January 1670[/1] and proved 2 March 1670/1, Matthew Allyn of Windsor bequeathed to wife Margaret Allyn entire estate for life (sons John Allyn, Thomas Allyn & Benjamin Nuberry to improve it for her benefit); to son John Allyn (after decease of Margaret Allyn) all lands in 'Kenillworth in the County of New London, I say both the farm & stock upon it' as well as land in Hartford previously given to him as his marriage portion; to son Thomas Allyn (after decease of Margaret Allyn) half of land at Catch [Simsbury] (out of which 'my beloved grandchild Mathew Allyn' is to get one hundred acres) as well as lands at Windsor already given him as his marriage portion; to son and daughter Benjamin and Mary Newbery (after decease of Margaret Allyn) other half of land at Catch (out of which 'my beloved grandchild Mary Maudsly' is to get fifty acres); to Mary Griffen (servant) 40s.; to John Indian one suit of clothes; to sons John and Thomas Allyn and daughter Mary Newbery residue equally; wife to be sole executrix. The inventory of the estate of 'Mr. Mathew Allyn deceased' was taken 14 February 1670/1 and totalled L466 17s. 2d., of which L160 was real estate: 'land & stock at Kennelworth,' L120; and 'land at Catch,' L40 ('the house & land in Windsor not inventoried because by a deed of gift it was made over to Thomas Allyn by Mr. Mathew Allyn at the marriage of the said Thom: Allyn to be to him & his heirs forever after the death of the said Mr. Mathew Allyn & Margaret his wife) [Hartford PD Case #104, Manwaring 1:171-72]."

      Matthew Allyn was the brother of "...Thomas Allyn of Barnstable, Plymouth Colony, as may be seen by following carefully the many entries for both Matthew and Thomas in Lechford, especially p. 418 which explicitly links the Barnstab le man with Braunton in Devonshire. Thomas Allen of Wethersfield was a different man and not related to this family, nor was Samuel Allen of Windsor any relation [Hale, House 447-48]. (Matthew Allyn's extensive litigation of 1650 was with his brother Thomas Allyn of Barnstable, and not with Thomas Allen of Wethersfield [RPCC 87-88; CCCR 1:211]).

      "Matthew Allyn was in some way related to William Spencer of Cambridge and Hartford, or, more probably, to his wife, Agnes Harris [TAG 63"33, 38=30, and other sources cited there]."

      "Matthew Allyn's first appearance in New England was in the grant of land in Cambridge on 4 November 1633 to seven men [CaTR 6], of whom three others (John Haynes, Thomas Hooker, and Samuel Stone) are known to have arrived 4 September 1633 on the Griffin [WJ 1:128-30]. ('Mathew Allen' does appear in a list dated 7 January 1632/3 of those ordered to fence in the common [CaTR 5], but this list must have been compiled about two years later, for it includes men such as John Haynes who did not arrive until late in 1633.)

      "Matthew Allyn seems out of place in Cambridge, as all others who arrived at about this time were from East Anglia; based on his English origin, one would expect Allyn to have resided first in Dorchester. This unusual residence for Allyn is probably tied up in some way with his relationship with William Spencer.

      "The date of Allyn's removal to Windsor (by 1648) derives from our knowledge of his officeholding. Although he owned land in Windsor long before that date, the first evidence of his residence in Windsor is his appearance in Connecticut General Court as deputy for Windsor on 18 May 1648. That he was deputy for Windsor and not for Hartford is confirmed by noting that each of the three oldest towns in the colony was allowed four deputies at this time, and only if Allyn was representing Windsor to the numbers come out right.

      "Besides being a man who was highly respected and who served society well, Matthew Allyn was a highly contentious man. We have already seen that he held lengthy disputes with his brother, and not long after he left Massachusetts he was wanted for 'debt and damage' he had left behind [7 October 1641: 'It is ordered, that a letter shalbe sent to Mr. Haynes & the rest of the magistrates at Connectecot, to send back the prisoner Mathewe Alleyn, or satisfy the debt & damage' [MBCR 1:339]. Further evidence of his ligitiousness may be found throughout the Connecticut court records [RPCC passim; CCCR passim]." [2]

  • Sources 
    1. [S30] Great Migration Begins, The , Robert Charles Anderson, (New England Historic Genealogical Society, 101 Newbury St., Boston, MA 02116, 1995), ISBN 0-88082-044-6., 42.

    2. [S30] Great Migration Begins, The , Robert Charles Anderson, (New England Historic Genealogical Society, 101 Newbury St., Boston, MA 02116, 1995), ISBN 0-88082-044-6., 40-44.